Multimedia

7
results found
1 - 7 of 7 Results
Date:
This photo essay provides a snapshot from UN Women’ latest flagship report, Progress of the World’s Women 2019-2020: Families in a Changing World, and UN Women programmes around the world.
Date:
Christine Banlog has been a market woman for 22 years. She is now 64, widowed, and raising her three grandchildren in Nyalla, Cameroon.
Date:
Since 2014, UN Women’s Markets for Change project has been boosting leadership and financial skills of women vendors in 17 markets to make them safe, inclusive and sustainable. For the first time, women’s voices are shaping market infrastructure and climate adaptation.
Date:
“Turning promises into action” is UN Women’s global report on gender equality in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. It makes an urgent call to step up efforts to end discrimination against women and girls everywhere. This infographic puts a spotlight on where the global community stands on gender equality under each of the 17 SDGs, and ends with a call to action on ways to make women and girls count going forward.
Date:
The health of our oceans is declining. This threatens the lives, livelihood and food security of billions of people. For island communities and those living around oceans and seas, the risk are even greater. Recently, UN Women visited the island nation of Seychelles, in the Indian Ocean Rim region, where ocean-based tourism is the backbone of the economy and men and women rely on the ocean for sustainable living. Women are also leading marine conservation and sustainable use of the ocean in Seychelles. This photo essay provides a glimpse into their efforts and impact.
Date:
Rural Liberian women are promoting renewable solar energy that reduces dependency on expensive and polluting fossil fuels, like kerosene.
Date:
On 13 March, 2015 Vanuatu was hit by Category Five Cyclone Pam, the worst disaster in the island nation’s recent history. More than half the population (of more than 860,000) was affected and around 96 per cent of crops were destroyed, leaving many women without food or produce to sell, which was their only source of income. In the months following the cyclone, a prolonged El Niño-fueled drought prevented replanting, causing months of crop failure, food insecurity and the decimation of the livelihoods of market vendors, majority women.