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Administrative data is crucial to better understand violence against women (VAW) and to inform prevention and responses to VAW. This publication identifies eight steps for improving the collection and use of VAW administrative data and makes recommendations for data producers and policymakers to help with future decision-making and planning.
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This brief shares key findings from UN Women’s learning process on disability markers, with a particular emphasis on the extra value that markers can add to organisations’ wider work to promote rights and equality for persons with disabilities.
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The “Intersectionality resource guide and toolkit” aims to help both organizations and individual practitioners and experts address intersectionality in policies, practices, and programmes. It may be used by entities, individuals, or teams to assess their own knowledge, attitudes, and practices at a programme level, as a supplement to existing design, adaptation, and assessment processes, or at policy level, to better understand and address the different and intersecting effects of policy on marginalised persons.
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This brief primarily focuses on providing a better understanding of the experiences of a diverse group of women with disabilities across the Asia-Pacific region during the COVID-19 crisis and provides recommendations that will be relevant for the ongoing response and recovery and promote the inclusion of women with disabilities.
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This brief primarily focuses on providing a better understanding of the experiences of a diverse group of women with disabilities during the COVID-19 crisis in Nigeria. It also provides recommendations that are relevant for the ongoing response and recovery efforts and promote the inclusion of women with disabilities.
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This brief primarily focuses on reasonable accommodation and accessibility with the objective to develop a greater understanding of these in institutional contexts, to strengthen organisations and institutions’ internal awareness and capacities, and to promote more detailed attention to accessibility and reasonable accommodation in the intersection with gender.
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In recent years, UN Women has increased its focus on innovation, based on the recognition that innovation and technology frequently do not benefit men and women equally but can potentially be leveraged for women’s empowerment. This evaluation assessed what innovation means for UN Women, the value added of UN Women’s work in this area, as well as its innovation initiatives, and the systems, processes, and culture to support innovation.
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This brief is intended to inform readers about accessibility and ways to monitor and assess accessibility, including accessibility audits. This brief provides key considerations for planning and conducting an accessibility audit and suggests a wide range of resources and tools on how to undertake an audit.
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This checklist is intended to guide stakeholders on how to prevent and respond to gender-based violence against women, girls, and gender non-conforming persons with disabilities during the COVID-19 pandemic and other emergencies.
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UN Women and Women Enabled International developed this “know your rights” guide in consultation with women with disabilities. The purpose of this document is to provide a user-friendly guide for women with disabilites across the globe to understand their rights in accessing support when experiencing gender-based violence and to enable them to advocate with States for their rights.
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This guidance tool aims to explain the practical steps towards enhancing the quality of women’s land rights data and statistics for data producers, analysts, and researchers. In doing so, it addresses critical gaps in the quality of the design, collection, analysis, management, and dissemination of data and statistics on women’s land rights. This tool is for use by data producers and data users alike.
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The pandemic has exposed and exacerbated existing gender data gaps that undermine our ability to intentionally craft gender-responsive policies and programmes. Filling these data gaps poses a significant challenge as many data collection efforts have been disrupted due to COVID-19 control measures, but without addressing these gender data gaps and collection obstacles, we cannot fully understand or mitigate the gendered impacts of the pandemic.
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This decision tree guides data collectors through the various considerations, viable options, and alternative data sources for obtaining information without jeopardizing participants’ safety or the data’s integrity. In doing so, it aims to identify data sources and methodologies that are useful for strengthening services and referral pathways for women experiencing violence during COVID-19.
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This report calls on global, national, and regional stakeholders to expand opportunities for girls and young women to be the changemakers and designers of the solutions to their challenges and opportunities; invest in the skills development of adolescent girls so they can compete in today’s labour market; improve girls’ health and nutrition; and end violence in all its forms against them.
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To monitor progress on efforts to eliminate violence against women (VAW), quality, standardized data are needed. Administrative data can provide vital information to understand the issue, and to inform policy and programmes to present and respond to VAW. This background paper synthesizes current information on key issues and ongoing debates on the collection and use of VAW administrative data collected and managed by authorities and different types of service providers.
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This brief summarizes Chapter 2 of UN Women’s flagship report, “Turning promises into action”. Investment in national statistical capacity is central to improving the coverage, quality, and timeliness of data for monitoring gender equality and the SDGs. Making sure data represent the lived reality of women and girls in all their diversity by addressing deep-seated biases in concepts, definitions, classifications, and methodologies, is essential to making women and girls visible.
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The International Men and Gender Equality Survey is the first multi-country study of its kind and size in the Middle East and North Africa. Coordinated by UN Women and Promundo, in collaboration with local research partners, the report takes a never-before-seen look at what it means to be a man in Egypt, Lebanon, Morocco, and Palestine today. Exploring key issues at home and at work, in public and private life, and their attitudes towards gender equality, and it also provides women’s perspectives on the same issues.
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Indigenous women have made remarkable contributions to the women, peace and security agenda, and have pioneered innovative approaches to conflict prevention and justice. Indigenous women’s experiences of intersectional discrimination, on the basis of their gender identity and minority status, also provide unique perspectives on conflict. These perspectives are a critical resource in our shared effort to build a more peaceful and inclusive world.
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This report provides a unique quantification of the costs in terms of lost growth opportunities and an estimate of what societies, economies, and communities would gain if the gender gap in agriculture is addressed. The findings of this report are striking, and send a strong signal to policy makers in Africa as well as development partners that closing the gender gap is smart economics. Consider this: closing the gender gap in agricultural productivity could potentially lift as many as 238,000 people out of poverty in Malawi, 80,000 people in Tanzania, and 119,000 people in Uganda.
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This paper examines how growth, social reproduction and gender equality are connected in ways that make paid and unpaid care work a key determinant of macroeconomic policy outcomes, growth and development. It was produced for UN Women's flagship report Progress of the World's Women 2015-2016 to be released as part of the UN Women discussion paper series.