6
results found
1 - 6 of 6 Results
Date:
The Gender Equality Working Group of the Sustainable Development Goal 3 Global Action Plan on Healthy Living and Well-being for All, chaired by UN Women, along with the Gender and Health Hub at the United Nations University International Institute for Global Health, developed a guidance note and a checklist of key actions to respond to gender-related barriers to vaccine access for countries to prioritize in COVID-19 national deployment and vaccination plans.  
Date:
How are women’s employment outcomes shaped by domestic and caregiving responsibilities? Drawing on a global dataset and new indicators developed by UN Women and the International Labour Organization, this paper provides insights into the distribution of domestic and caregiving responsibilities within various types of households—insights that are critical at this juncture when policies and programmes are being designed to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic’s economic fallout.
Date:
This handbook provides practical guidance, elaborated with case studies, on how additional fiscal space can be created for a universal social protection system. The analyses should help governments on how they can increase spending on priority sectors for women, children, and vulnerable groups.
Date:
This paper summarizes the findings of a study that shows that a life-cycle approach can help to reveal meaningful differences in the way women, men, girls, and boys experience poverty. It examines the different life stages as they transition to adulthood and form their own households, and tracks changes from childhood to childbearing and beyond. This is the first study to look at these dimensions systematically at the global level.
Date:
Identifying fiscal space for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals is increasingly recognized as a priority by all development actors. This innovative working paper produced by ILO, UNICEF and UN Women considers options for 187 countries to support an expansion of public investments, especially for social investments.
Date:
This report provides a unique quantification of the costs in terms of lost growth opportunities and an estimate of what societies, economies, and communities would gain if the gender gap in agriculture is addressed. The findings of this report are striking, and send a strong signal to policy makers in Africa as well as development partners that closing the gender gap is smart economics. Consider this: closing the gender gap in agricultural productivity could potentially lift as many as 238,000 people out of poverty in Malawi, 80,000 people in Tanzania, and 119,000 people in Uganda.