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In an increasingly digitized world, one of the more concerning dynamics is technology-facilitated violence against women. This brief paper summarizes the scoping review and key recommendations on the approaches to collecting data on technology-facilitated violence against women, the current state of evidence and data, and the challenges presented in the research paper, “Technology-facilitated violence against women: taking stock of evidence and data collection”.
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This paper offers a landscape scan highlighting what is known about technology-facilitated violence against women, who is currently generating this knowledge, and how the evidence is being produced. The paper also highlights some of the related methodological, ethical, and sociopolitical challenges to collecting data on technology-facilitated violence against women. As a way forward, actions for strengthening knowledge generation and data collection are proposed, including recommendations on methods and further research.
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This brochure captures the underlying features and best practices of UN Women’s Second Chance Education (SCE) programme. This illustrative brochure captures some of the broad transformative approaches, including support to address gender-based barriers, gender-transformative life skills, SCE learning pathways, advocacy and policy work, personalized support, and e-learning. Specific scenarios from different SCE programme geographies are also discussed in the brochure.
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This publication is an account of the experiences of implementing UN Women’s Second Chance Education (SCE) programme in the six countries in which it was piloted: Australia, Cameroon, Chile, India, Jordan, and Mexico. It provides extensive examples of the ways that implementing partners have designed and delivered the components of the programme in different contexts, along with thoughts from staff, volunteers, and participants.
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This handbook provides an overview of the characteristics of the Second Chance Education (SCE) hubs: physical spaces where women who are part of the SCE Programme participate in in-person learning activities. This publication is underpinned by a series of virtual hub tours that provide a glimpse into the way partners have been carrying out the programme across six different countries.
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Drawing on the experiences of UN Women’s Second Chance Education (SCE) programme, this guide offers practical guidance on implementing a gender-transformative second chance education programme for women. It describes SCE’s signature features and gives examples of how they have been implemented in the different contexts of the six pilot SCE countries of Australia, Cameroon, Chile, India, Jordan, and Mexico.
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UN Women convened an expert group in November 2022 to develop a common, comprehensive definition of technology-facilitated violence against women (TF VAW) that could be used as the basis to fill the data gap around the prevalence of TF VAW. This report captures the main points that were discussed during the two-day meeting and explains the rationale behind the development of the proposed definition.
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This publication delves into the lessons learned through UN Women’s Second Chance Education (SCE) Programme’s online learning initiatives in the six countries in which SCE was piloted: Australia, Cameroon, Chile, India, Jordan, and Mexico. Thousands of women have been introduced to e-learning through SCE for the first time. This publication draws on the experiences across all six countries and outlines the top 10 lessons learned.
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The priority theme of the 67th session of the Commission on the Status of Women is “Innovation and technological change, and education in the digital age for achieving gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls”. This publication includes findings and recommendations of the Expert Group Meeting (EGM) on the priority theme; summaries of EGM background papers, expert papers, and informational notes; and analysis of relevant normative frameworks.
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On 24 December 2022, the Taliban banned women from working in international and national non-governmental organizations, the latest attack in a series of systematic infringements on the fundamental rights of women and girls since August 2021. Developed two weeks after the ban, this gender alert analyses the impact of the directive through the insights of Afghan women’s civil society organizations.
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This guidance note is part of a series of guidance notes on gender analysis in technical areas that seeks to contribute to more effective gender mainstreaming in and beyond the UN system. The focus in this guide is the thematic area of digital inclusion, an area in which gender analysis has been less widely implemented than in some other sectors.
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These recommendations are the first of their kind and underline the critical role migrant women human rights defenders play in securing the rights of people on the move. Migrant women human rights defenders include women, girls, and gender-diverse persons of all ages who promote and protect the human rights of people on the move, whether they are migrants themselves or not, irrespective of whether they self-identify as a woman human rights defenders.
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This research paper provides an overview of the global estimates of gender-related killings of women and girls in the private sphere in 2021. It also features policy recommendations to support comprehensive and multisectoral approaches to prevent and address gender-related killings and other forms of gender-based violence against women and girls.
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This paper proposes replacing the United Nations Development Programme’s (UNDP) Gender Inequality Index with two new gender indexes: the Global Gender Parity Index and the Women’s Empowerment Index. The proposal builds on a review of concepts of gender equality in the capability approach that underpins UNDP’s human development paradigm and the relevant international policy frameworks. It also implements current proposals for reform.
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This paper provides a brief overview of the existing data and evidence on online and technology facilitated VAWG, outlines some of the key developments, gaps, challenges, and emerging promising practices, and makes recommendations to be considered by governments, international organizations, civil society organizations, and the technology sector.
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TRAMSFORM issue 24 features the corporate evaluation of UN Women’s apporach to innovation. In recent years, UN Women has increased its focus on innovation, based on the recognition that innovation and technology frequently do not benefit men and women equally, but can potentially be leveraged for women’s empowerment. This evaluation assessed what innovation means for UN Women, its innovation initiatives and the systems, and culture to support innovation.
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The present report is focused on the urgent need to address violence against women and girls in digital contexts, as well as on broader efforts to eliminate violence against women, particularly in the context of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19). The report provides information on measures taken by Member States and entities of the United Nations system to address violence against women and girls, and contains conclusions and specific recommendations for future action.
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The Taliban’s position on women’s rights has been central to its worldview and vision for society. This gender alert documents how changing dynamics in Afghanistan are impacting women’s rights and gender equality one year after the Taliban take-over of Afghanistan on 15 August 2021.
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With the aim of continuing to strengthen and support the evaluation function, the UN Women Independent Evaluation Service (IES) has developed an updated version of the evaluation handbook. The handbook follows the evaluation process through planning, preparation, conduct, reporting, evaluation, use, and follow-up. For each stage, the handbook has been updated to align with the current UN Women evaluation policy and coverage norms, as well as IES structure, governance, and processes.
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This research paper and policy brief explore what women’s meaningful participation in transitional justice means and “looks like” in policy and practice. The publications focus specifically on women and addressing the unique barriers to women’s meaningful participation in transitional justice processes as a result of gender-based discrimination.