23
results found
1 - 20 of 23 Results
Date:
In an increasingly digitized world, one of the more concerning dynamics is technology-facilitated violence against women. This brief paper summarizes the scoping review and key recommendations on the approaches to collecting data on technology-facilitated violence against women, the current state of evidence and data, and the challenges presented in the research paper, “Technology-facilitated violence against women: taking stock of evidence and data collection”.
Date:
This paper offers a landscape scan highlighting what is known about technology-facilitated violence against women, who is currently generating this knowledge, and how the evidence is being produced. The paper also highlights some of the related methodological, ethical, and sociopolitical challenges to collecting data on technology-facilitated violence against women. As a way forward, actions for strengthening knowledge generation and data collection are proposed, including recommendations on methods and further research.
Date:
This brochure captures the underlying features and best practices of UN Women’s Second Chance Education (SCE) programme. This illustrative brochure captures some of the broad transformative approaches, including support to address gender-based barriers, gender-transformative life skills, SCE learning pathways, advocacy and policy work, personalized support, and e-learning. Specific scenarios from different SCE programme geographies are also discussed in the brochure.
Date:
This publication is an account of the experiences of implementing UN Women’s Second Chance Education (SCE) programme in the six countries in which it was piloted: Australia, Cameroon, Chile, India, Jordan, and Mexico. It provides extensive examples of the ways that implementing partners have designed and delivered the components of the programme in different contexts, along with thoughts from staff, volunteers, and participants.
Date:
This handbook provides an overview of the characteristics of the Second Chance Education (SCE) hubs: physical spaces where women who are part of the SCE Programme participate in in-person learning activities. This publication is underpinned by a series of virtual hub tours that provide a glimpse into the way partners have been carrying out the programme across six different countries.
Date:
Drawing on the experiences of UN Women’s Second Chance Education (SCE) programme, this guide offers practical guidance on implementing a gender-transformative second chance education programme for women. It describes SCE’s signature features and gives examples of how they have been implemented in the different contexts of the six pilot SCE countries of Australia, Cameroon, Chile, India, Jordan, and Mexico.
Date:
UN Women convened an expert group in November 2022 to develop a common, comprehensive definition of technology-facilitated violence against women (TF VAW) that could be used as the basis to fill the data gap around the prevalence of TF VAW. This report captures the main points that were discussed during the two-day meeting and explains the rationale behind the development of the proposed definition.
Date:
This publication delves into the lessons learned through UN Women’s Second Chance Education (SCE) Programme’s online learning initiatives in the six countries in which SCE was piloted: Australia, Cameroon, Chile, India, Jordan, and Mexico. Thousands of women have been introduced to e-learning through SCE for the first time. This publication draws on the experiences across all six countries and outlines the top 10 lessons learned.
Date:
The priority theme of the 67th session of the Commission on the Status of Women is “Innovation and technological change, and education in the digital age for achieving gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls”. This publication includes findings and recommendations of the Expert Group Meeting (EGM) on the priority theme; summaries of EGM background papers, expert papers, and informational notes; and analysis of relevant normative frameworks.
Date:
This paper provides a brief overview of the existing data and evidence on online and technology facilitated VAWG, outlines some of the key developments, gaps, challenges, and emerging promising practices, and makes recommendations to be considered by governments, international organizations, civil society organizations, and the technology sector.
Date:
TRAMSFORM issue 24 features the corporate evaluation of UN Women’s apporach to innovation. In recent years, UN Women has increased its focus on innovation, based on the recognition that innovation and technology frequently do not benefit men and women equally, but can potentially be leveraged for women’s empowerment. This evaluation assessed what innovation means for UN Women, its innovation initiatives and the systems, and culture to support innovation.
Date:
The present report is focused on the urgent need to address violence against women and girls in digital contexts, as well as on broader efforts to eliminate violence against women, particularly in the context of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19). The report provides information on measures taken by Member States and entities of the United Nations system to address violence against women and girls, and contains conclusions and specific recommendations for future action.
Date:
The report presents the evidence-based business case for gender-responsive procurement. It makes the case for companies to rethink their procurement practices, framing gender-responsive procurement as a way to create social and economic value amid increasing economic uncertainty.
Date:
The digital revolution brings immense potential to improve social and economic outcomes for women. Yet, it also poses the risk of perpetuating existing patterns of gender inequality. This report begins by outlining a conceptual framework for understanding the mutual shaping relationship between gender and technology. It then focuses on three areas to identify opportunities and risks in the digital revolution: education, work, and social/welfare services.
Date:
This brief explains how companies are responding to the problem of domestic violence during the COVID-19 pandemic and provides recommendations on the measures that could be taken.
Date:
This brief highlights emerging trends and impacts of COVID-19 on online and ICT-facilitated violence against women and girls (VAWG). It provides examples of strategies put in place to prevent and respond to online/ICT-facilitated VAWG and makes recommendations on how different actors can best address this issue. It is a living document that draws upon the knowledge and experience of a wide range of experts.
Date:
This brochure showcases some of UN Women’s thoughts and practices around innovation that could accelerate gender equality and women’s empowerment. The examples range from pilot programmes with marginalized beneficiaries to partnerships with start-ups; from frontier technologies to non-tech interventions that challenge mindsets; and from procedural improvements to capacity-building.
Date:
The GICC is a dynamic partnership between UN Women and key representatives from the private sector, academia and nonprofit institutions focused on developing the innovation market to work better for women and to accelerate the achievement of gender equality and women’s empowerment. This booklet outlines information on each of the GICC members.     
Date:
This background paper highlights the key barriers that contribute towards creating and sustaining the gender gap in innovation and technology and outlines the concrete action that UN Women and its partners are taking to address them.
Date:
The 2030 Sustainable Development Goals, founded on the principle of 'leaving no one behind' call for transformative shifts, integrated approaches, and innovative solutions to overcome the structural barriers to sustainable development. Innovation and technology provide unpreceded opportunities to reach those who are the most likely to be left behind.