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Administrative data is crucial to better understand violence against women (VAW) and to inform prevention and responses to VAW. This publication identifies eight steps for improving the collection and use of VAW administrative data and makes recommendations for data producers and policymakers to help with future decision-making and planning.
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This research paper and policy brief explore what women’s meaningful participation in transitional justice means and “looks like” in policy and practice. The publications focus specifically on women and addressing the unique barriers to women’s meaningful participation in transitional justice processes as a result of gender-based discrimination.
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UN Women partnered with the Inter-Parliamentary Union to prepare a handbook on gender-responsive law-making. This handbook aims to serve as a resource for lawmakers from around the world for designing gender-responsive laws. Such law-making should address the strategic needs of women and girls and must encompass enacting new laws and amending or repealing laws which are outdated, inconsistent with constitutions, or discriminate against them.
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This training manual is designed for actors involved in the prevention and countering of violent extremism (P/CVE) in Europe and Central Asia including state officials, members of non-governmental organizations, community activists, staff of UN agencies, international and regional organizations to help them understand violent extremism’s gender dimensions.
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Under the framework of the UN Joint Global Programme on Essential Services, UN Women, together with UNODC and the IAWP, have developed a handbook on gender-responsive police services for women and girls subject to violence. The handbook is based on and complements existing global and country-specific handbooks and training materials for law enforcement and covers areas such as gender-responsive police investigations, prevention, intersectionality and institutional change.
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This brief series recognizes that, despite advancements, we have to build a stronger bridge between empirical scholarly work, new policy directions, and actual practice on the ground. The series seeks to address that gap and contribute to the realization of the women, peace and security agenda through the promotion of evidence-based policy and practice.
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This rapid assessment examines how the impacts of COVID-19 are threatening women’s ability to access justice. The assessment reflects challenges faced by women and girls of diverse backgrounds and socio-economic groups, including those experiencing overlapping disadvantages and those facing amplified challenges in humanitarian settings. Cross-regional and local experiences are highlighted, and quantitative data is utilized where available.
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This brief explores the implications for the provision of essential services for women and girls who have experienced violence during the COVID-19 pandemic. It provides recommendations for governments, civil society, and international organizations that are seeking to improve the quality of and access to coordinated health, police and justice, and social services for all women and girls during the crisis and provides examples of promising practices to date.
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On the tenth anniversary of UN Women’s establishment, this report brings together research and evidence from state and non-state actors to demonstrate how laws around the world treat women and girls, using trends since 2015 which highlight both gains and ongoing challenges. The report also shares UN Women’s best practices and lessons learned in legal reforms with stakeholders within and outside the UN system, through diverse examples of interventions.
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Around the world, young women are working to prevent violent conflict, recover from crises, and build peaceful, tolerant communities, yet most peace and security interventions are blind to the needs and contributions of young women. This paper examines the diverse roles that young women play in these contexts and offers recommendations for ensuring their meaningful inclusion and participation in building and sustaining peace.
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This report is the outcome of a two-day conference on reparations for survivors of conflict-related sexual violence (CRSV) held on 8 and 9 June 2016 outside Sarajevo, in Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina. It captures the successes of reparations programmes in the Western Balkans, challenges and setbacks, good practices, and lessons learned, and offers a comparative analysis of laws and policies on reparations in post-conflict countries in the sub-region.
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This report examines what ‘a gender perspective’ in peace agreements might mean, suggesting that the term has not been fully enough considered. It also produces data on when women have been specifically mentioned in peace agreements. The data summary shows that peace agreement references to women have increased over time. Yet, only a few of these agreements provide evidence of adopting a robust ‘gender perspective.’
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Reparations for conflict-related sexual violence remain a pressing issue in many parts of the world. The Conflict Did Not Bring Us Flowers brings the voices of survivors of sexual violence during the 1998-1999 armed conflict in Kosovo to the foreground, and proposes measures for the development of comprehensive reparations for survivors.
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Indigenous women have made remarkable contributions to the women, peace and security agenda, and have pioneered innovative approaches to conflict prevention and justice. Indigenous women’s experiences of intersectional discrimination, on the basis of their gender identity and minority status, also provide unique perspectives on conflict. These perspectives are a critical resource in our shared effort to build a more peaceful and inclusive world.
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The 2007-2008 global financial crisis and subsequent austerity policies have jeopardized the realization of women’s economic and social rights. The resulting job losses, decreased social services, and increased economic insecurity have weakened the capacity of people to perform unpaid care work. In this paper, UN Women calls on States to meet their human rights obligations by taking a transformative approach to economic and social policy and designing recovery policies that promote gender equality and women’s rights.
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This inter-agency study is a call to action based an overview of existing evidence from Africa, Asia Pacific and Latin America. It highlights that the forms and nature of violence that women and girls experience are shaped and influenced by the often multiple forms of discrimination they face. They can be based on factors such as age, ethnicity, geographic location, or disability, and intersect with gender inequality and discrimination.
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This collection of papers is a set of resource materials to support improved implementation of the five WPS resolutions. It consists of analytical documents explaining gender issues in a number of peace and security areas, both normative and operational, and of guidance material to support operational work.
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Historically, the world has been silent about the situation of women in war, almost as silent as the women who remain on the sidelines during war or who are excluded from peace negotiations. In addition, women often lack the confidence and the knowledge needed to participate in peace building and reconstruction.