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This publication addresses the importance of having a proactive gender-responsive framework for countering terrorism and preventing violent extremism. It offers guidance to UN Women’s community of practice to carry out due diligence, measures that respond to challenges identified, and most importantly, to support risk-aware decision-making at all levels.
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This programmatic note outlines UN Women’s theory of change and strategies of implementation in supporting women’s rights in the context of counter-terrorism and prevention of violent extremism.
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This toolkit for identifying gender persecution in conflicts and atrocities provides a framework for recognizing and understanding illicit conduct that amounts to gender persecution to investigators, lawyers, advocates, documenters, first responders, and others who engage in identifying gender-based crimes or their victims in conflict and atrocity settings.
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This policy brief provides a critical assessment of the “men for gender equality” field, and proposes new directions for programming and policy on men and boys. This includes moving away from a focus on individual men’s identities, attitudes and behaviours, and towards a greater focus on the structures and systems that sustain gender inequalities.
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This report on the proceedings of the global conference “Gender-inclusive peace processes: Strengthening women’s meaningful participation through constituency building” explores current challenges, best practices, and recommendations on how best to leverage the practice of constituency building to further gender-inclusive peace.
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This research explores the causes of the under-investment in gender-inclusive peace in conflict and post-conflict settings and the significant gaps in financing that make the implementation of Women, Peace and security commitments more difficult. This paper focuses on the three case studies of Colombia, Iraq, and the Philippines.
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This issue of TRANSFORM summarizes the “Corporate thematic evaluation of UN Women’s support to National Action Plans on women, peace, and security”. Through this evaluation, the Independent Evaluation Service assessed the criteria of coherence and coordination, effectiveness, organizational efficiency, sustainability, and the extent to which a human rights approach and gender equality principles were integrated into National Action Plans to meet women, peace, and security commitments and adopt accountability frameworks in conflict and post-conflict countries.
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This report on the proceedings of the 2018 conference “Women’s meaningful participation in peace processes: Modalities and strategies across tracks”, explores innovations, trends, and challenges in the interplay between official, high-level processes and unofficial processes in which civil society plays a leadership role.
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This paper examines the characteristics of past and contemporary feminisms and dissects the issues with periodizing feminism in terms of “waves”. Part two focuses on understanding the most recent wave of feminist activism by considering its antecedents and main characteristics. It presents three case studies of movements in the Global South; the cases of Brazil, India, and Malawi illustrate some of the ideas, campaigns, and organizational forms of “new feminists”.

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This brief series recognizes that, despite advancements, we have to build a stronger bridge between empirical scholarly work, new policy directions, and actual practice on the ground. The series seeks to address that gap and contribute to the realization of the women, peace and security agenda through the promotion of evidence-based policy and practice.
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UN Women has played a key role in supporting the development and implementation of National Action Plans (NAPs) on women, peace, and security (WPS) as the main tool by which global WPS frameworks are translated into actions and outcomes at national level. The corporate evaluation of WPS NAPs assessed the relevance, coherence, effectiveness, efficiency, sustainability, and extent to which human rights and gender equality principles were integrated to meet WPS commitments and adopt accountability frameworks.
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This brief focuses on the impacts of COVID-19 on women and girls in sports in five areas—leadership, gender-based violence, economic opportunities, media participation and representation, and girls’ participation in sport—and presents key recommendations to different actors in the sport ecosystem to respond to the crisis with a gender perspective and recover better in terms of gender equality.
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This study serves as an evidence-based instrument that demonstrates how leveraging attitudinal change can be used as a critical tactic towards advancing gender equality. The findings have the potential to inform policymakers, advertisers, private sector leaders, civil society, and decision-makers on challenging discriminatory attitudes and gender roles that perpetuate gender inequality and women’s subordinate status in society.
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In an effort to address the impacts of COVID-19, companies are developing a number of socially beneficial communications for the public. It is essential that these communications avoid harmful stereotypes and seek to depict positive and progressive gender portrayals.
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Modern day society is surrounded by media (television, film, radio, print and social media); consuming information, entertainment and ever-increasing channels of communication. These platforms, and the content they deliver, present both unrelenting challenges and incredible opportunities for achieving gender equality and eliminating violence against women and girls. This handbook is designed to provide specific guidance on how to work with media for the achievement of these goals.
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This report reflects the findings of the May 2018 Expert Group Meeting on women’s meaningful participation in negotiating peace and the implementation of peace agreements, and offers key insights from leading practitioners and experts on the progress and challenges for women’s meaningful participation across a diverse range of countries and peace processes.
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This media study is part of UN Women’s EU-funded project, “Promoting and protecting women migrant workers’ labour and human rights: Engaging with international, national human rights mechanisms to enhance accountability”. It focuses on representations of women migrant workers in sending and receiving countries. Articles from newspapers in Canada, Italy, Mexico, and the Philippines are analysed using a gender perspective. Three dominant representations of WMWs are identified: victims, heroes and threats. The implications of these representations are explored and a woman migrant worker–centred approach is recommended.
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The survey confirms that UN Women publications are widely useful to a diverse audience including the UN agencies, NGOs and CSOs, policy makers, development agencies, private sector agencies, academic institutions and gender equality and women’s empowerment advocates. From the study it was clear that UN Women publications and studies on gender equality and women's empowerment issues have been responsible for many improvements in the quality of life for women and girls. The respondents affirmed having used re-search and evidence from the studies in development interventions and policy-making processes aimed at improving the lives of women and girls through more effective policies that respond to regional priorities and use resources more efficiently to better meet citizens’ needs in various perspectives of gender equality and women’s empowerment.
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Indigenous women have made remarkable contributions to the women, peace and security agenda, and have pioneered innovative approaches to conflict prevention and justice. Indigenous women’s experiences of intersectional discrimination, on the basis of their gender identity and minority status, also provide unique perspectives on conflict. These perspectives are a critical resource in our shared effort to build a more peaceful and inclusive world.
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This Guidebook aims to increase knowledge about the CEDAW Committee’s landmark General recommendation no. 30 on women in conflict prevention, conflict and post-conflict situations, and the Security Council resolutions on women, peace and security, and how these frameworks can be used to strengthen and reinforce each other. The Guidebook provides information on the content of the General Recommendation and the Security Council resolutions and on the reporting and monitoring mechanisms.