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Violence against women and girls is an unacceptable violation of basic human rights. It also is so widespread that ending it must be a public health priority. An estimated one in three women is beaten, coerced into sex or otherwise abused by an intimate partner during her lifetime. Intimate partner violence has been shown to increase the risk of HIV infection by around 50 per cent, and violence (and the fear of violence) deters women and girls from seeking services for HIV prevention, treatment, care and support.
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This report distills vast data and hundreds of studies to shed new light on constraints facing women and girls worldwide, from epidemic levels of gender-based violence to biased laws and norms that prevent them from owning property, working, and making decisions about their own lives. It highlights promising reforms and interventions from around the world and charts an urgent agenda for governments, civil society, development agencies and other stakeholders.
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The publication analyses the progress of gender equality in the region 15 years after the approval of the Beijing Platform for Action, 10 years after the drafting of the Millennium Development Goals and three years after the adoption of the Quito Consensus at the tenth session of the Regional Conference on Women in Latin America and the Caribbean, held in 2007.
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Over the past decade, the issue of honour-related violence has entered media and policy debates in immigrant-receiving countries like the Netherlands, Germany, Britain and Canada. In some of these countries, media debate has instigated policy debate. This paper analyses how media, parliaments and other State institutions, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) conceptualize honour killing and honour-related violence in order to uncover how such conceptualizations inform policy responses.
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The aim of this document is to identify the sexual violence elements of the jurisprudence of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), and the Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL). It offers a comprehensive overview of the various ways that sexual violence in armed conflict can be interpreted and addressed under international law.
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This document aims to provide sufficient information for policymakers and planners to develop data-driven and evidence-based programmes for preventing intimate partner and sexual violence against women.