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The purpose of this policy brief is to offer stakeholders some suggestions on elements and data that may help them to assess whether they are implementing the new sustainable development framework in a gender-sensitive manner.
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This note aims to provide policy and operational guidance for United Nations engagement in the area of reparations for victims of conflict-related sexual violence, including activities to advocate for and/or support the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of reparation programmes and initiatives directed at victims of conflict-related sexual violence. The note is intended to complement other relevant UN tools and guidance notes, in particular the notes on the UN approach to rule of law assistance and to transitional justice.
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The aim of this policy brief is to highlight some linkages between gender and economics, especially trade, in the context of the post-2015 development agenda and propose future targets and indicators for the areas covered by Goals 3 and 8. Indeed, only if women are economically empowered can they benefit from the opportunities arising from expanded trade. In turn, trade can play its role of “enabler” of development if flanking economic and social policies are in place.
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The document discusses the two major challenges to development in Latin America and the Caribbean today: to achieve greater equality and to make development sustainable for future generations.
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By unanimous vote, the Security Council adopted the present resolution which sets in place stronger measures to enable women to participate in conflict resolution and recovery, and puts the onus on the Security Council, the United Nations, regional organizations and Member States to dismantle the barriers, create the space, and provide seats at the table for women.
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This publication is a collection of evidence-based papers by scholars and practitioners that explore the interconnections between gender equality and sustainable development across a range of sectors and development issues such as energy, health, education, food security, climate change, human rights, consumption and production patterns, and urbanization.
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On 24 June 2013, the UN Security Council sent a strong signal to perpetrators of sexual violence in conflict that their crimes will not be tolerated, adopting a new resolution to strengthen efforts to end impunity for a scourge that affects not only large numbers of women and girls but also men and boys.
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The report sets out a universal agenda to eradicate extreme poverty by 2030, and deliver on the promise of sustainable development. The high-level panel on the Post-2015 Development Agenda was co-chaired by Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and United Kingdom Prime Minister David Cameron.
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The report summarizes the findings of the consultation facilitated by the United Nations system since August 2012. An unprecedented series of consultations were held with people the world over to seek their views on a new development agenda to build on the successes of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). This conversation responds to a growing call for active participation in shaping the ‘world we want’. Taking place well before governments sit down to negotiate and finalize such a new agenda, the consultations underway provide evidence and perspectives to governments on the challenges people face in improving their lives and those of their families and communities.
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This paper offers some practical suggestions for the formulation of the successor arrangement to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Furthermore, the paper emphasizes that success will depend on the clarity, conciseness and +measurability of the post-2015 agenda. The two essential ingredients for success are time and leadership.
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The strategic results framework provides a joint vision for action to advance implementation of Security Council resolution 1325 (2000) and related resolutions on women and peace and security.
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A set of indicators for use at the level to track implementation of Security Council resolution 1325 (2000). Published in the report of the Secretary-General to the Security Council on Women and Peace and Security 2010.
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The report analyses the needs of women and girls in post-conflict situations; identifies the challenges to women’s participation in preventing, resolving and recovering from conflict; and specifies national and international measures aimed at ensuring that women’s priorities are addressed, their right to full participation is realized, a gender perspective is applied to peacebuilding, and all public actions are consistent with States’international human rights obligations.
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The guidelines aim to support a more integrated response by military peacekeepers, other peacekeeping mission components, UN entities and nongovernmental organizations working to implement Security Council mandates on women, peace and security.
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The release of the 2010 edition of the State of World Population report coincides with the tenth anniversary of UN Security Council resolution 1325, which recognizes and seeks to address the vulnerability of women and girls to violence during and after armed conflict, and the absence or low level of women’s representation in efforts to prevent war, build peace and restore devastated societies.
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The aim of this document is to identify the sexual violence elements of the jurisprudence of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), and the Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL). It offers a comprehensive overview of the various ways that sexual violence in armed conflict can be interpreted and addressed under international law.
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This landmark resolution reaffirms the important role of women in the prevention and resolution of conflicts, peace negotiations, peacebuilding, peacekeeping, humanitarian response and in post-conflict reconstruction and stresses the importance of their equal participation and full involvement in all efforts for the maintenance and promotion of peace and security.