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The State of the World’s Children calls for   brave and fresh thinking to address age-old problems that still affect the most disadvantaged children. In particular, the report calls for innovation – and for the best and brightest solutions coming from communities to be taken to scale to benefit every child.
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The 2014 Human Development Report “Sustaining Human Progress: Reducing Vulnerabilities and Building Resilience” shows that overall trends in human development are positive. Yet, people at all ages are also facing threats and challenges to their well-being, including by natural or human-induced disasters and crises.
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The report highlights the critical role data and monitoring play in realizing children’s rights. Credible data, disseminated effectively and used correctly, make it possible to target interventions that help right the wrong of exclusion. Data do not, in and of themselves, change the world. They make change possible – by identifying needs, supporting advocacy, gauging progress and holding duty bearers to account. Making what’s possible real is up to decision-makers.
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The 2013 Human Development Report examines the rise of the south and identifies more than 40 developing countries that have done better than expected in human development in recent decades, with their progress accelerating markedly over the past 10 years.
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Every day in developing countries, 20,000 girls below age 18 give birth. Nine in 10 of these births occur within marriage or a union. This has consequences on the health, education, employment and rights of an untold millions of girls. What are the challenges of adolescent pregnancy, and what can we do to ensure girls have a healthy and safe transition into adulthood?
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This report is a clarion call to decision-makers, parents, communities and to the world to end child marriage. It documents the current scope, prevalence and inequities associated with child marriage and highlights that by 2020, some 142 million girls will be married by their eighteenth birthday if current trends continue.
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This twentieth anniversary United Nations Development Programme report finds long-term progress in health, education not determined by income; introduces new indices for gender, poverty, inequality.
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The World’s Women 2010: Trends and Statistics is the fifth issue of The World’s Women and is being produced to coincide with the first-ever World’s Statistics Day. The report highlights the differences in the status of women and men in eight areas – population and families, health, education, work, power and decision-making, violence against women, environment and poverty. Analyses are based mainly on statistics from international and national satistical sources.
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The report argues that reproductive health care, including family planning, and gender relations could influence the future course of climate change and affect how humanity adapts to rising seas, worsening storms and severe droughts. Women, especially impoverished women in developing countries, bear the disproportionate burden of climate change, but have so far been overlooked in the debate about how to address problems of climate change, the report concludes.
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By 2030, towns and cities will be home to almost 5 billion people. The urban population of Africa and Asia will double in less than a generation. This unprecedented shift could enhance development and promote sustainability – or it could deepen poverty and accelerate environmental degradation. Women's empowerment and well-being are the pillars of sustainable cities.
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The World's Women 2005: Progress in Statistics is the first to review and analyse national capacity to collect and report sex-disaggregated data on core socioeconomic topics relevant for addressing gender concerns.
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Each year, UNICEF's flagship publication, The State of the World's Children, closely examines a key issue affecting children. The report includes supporting data and statistics and is available in French and Spanish language versions.
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Half of international migrants’ 95 million are women and girls. Yet, despite substantial contributions to their families at home and communities abroad, the needs of migrant women continue to be overlooked and ignored. The State of World Population 2006 report examines the scope and breadth of female migration, the impact of the funds they send home to support families and communities, and their disproportionate vulnerability to trafficking, exploitation and abuse.