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Despite the myriad challenges of collecting data in conflict, UN Women has been working tirelessly with partners to gather, analyse and disseminate data to illustrate the differential and disproportionate impacts of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine on women and girls. At least five publications have been produced so far, revealing the grim reality of war and its evolution, particularly for the most vulnerable women and girls.
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This International Women’s Day, 8 March, join UN Women and the world in coming together under the theme “Gender equality today for a sustainable tomorrow”, and call for climate action for women, by women.
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UN Women in partnership with the Australian Government has launched the global Women’s Resilience to Disasters (WRD) Knowledge Hub during the UN Disaster Risk Reduction Support Group meeting held today with Member States.
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Join us on International Day of Women and Girls in Science, 11 February, as we call for women’s full and equal access to and participation in science, and celebrate those that are leading action and innovation around the world.
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Dr. Aiymgul Kerimray is an environmentalist and a senior researcher at Al-Farabi Kazakh National University in Almaty, Kazakhstan. On the occasion of International Day of Women and Girls in Science, UN Women spoke to Kerimray about her research on energy poverty and air quality in urban areas and its gendered impacts.
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Norah Magero is a Mechanical Engineer and a Renewable Energy Expert from Kenya with experience in the design and management of off-grid energy technologies.
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Men outnumber women three to one across COVID-19 government task forces around the world. Such disproportionate representation will hamper women’s recovery from the pandemic, according to new data released by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), UN Women, and the Gender Inequality Research Lab (GIRL) at the University of Pittsburgh.
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A survey to assess the gendered impacts of COVID-19 on women’s and men’s lives and livelihoods in ten countries/territories across Europe and Central Asia has revealed dire findings.
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The COVID-19 pandemic is largely concentrated in cities and urban areas, with around 2,600 cities globally reporting at least one case of the disease. While the epicentre of the global health crisis is still Europe and North America, its impact on developing countries may be more devastating, especially for the poorest. The 1 billion+ people living in slums and slum-like settings in developing countries, where population density is high, are those most at-risk and least prepared.
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In Ngorongoro, a remote district in Arusha, rural communities are bearing the brunt of a changing climate that is ravaging many parts of East Africa. The Energize project is working to build new skills for out-of-school pastoralist adolescent girls and young women on biogas and solar energy products, as well as on how to run sustainable businesses.
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On 24 September, on the margins of the UN General-Assembly, UN Women hosted an interactive data lab to showcase the new Women Count Data Hub, the first of its kind to provide public access to gender data that can be used to monitor progress on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).
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Tanzania recently hosted the Planning and Implementation of Prevalence Surveys on Violence Against Women Regional Workshop for Eastern and Southern Africa, organized by UN Women in close collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), and funded by the Department for International Development of the United Kingdom (DFID). In this interview, UN Women Representative for Tanzania, Hodan Addou explains why having reliable data and evidence is key to preventing and addressing violence against women.
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Refika Cornoleus, escaped the war in Sudan with her her six children, but had to leave behind her home, her husband and her grandparents. She lives in Kakuma Refugee Camp in Kenya, where she makes eco-friendly stoves, which are high in demand.
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Sok Sopheap sets off to run errands and pick up her two grandchildren from school in Tropang Thom village, southern Cambodia. Sopheap is in her 50’s – a stage in life when many women in her country might slow down – but like many local women, she is bearing an increasingly heavy burden as a result of climate change.
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Trin Gim has achieved not only financial success with her pig farm, but has harvested waste from the pigs to be converted into combustible methane gas that can be used as energy for cooking and household needs.
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Martha Benavente, from Tucurú, a small municipality in Guatemala trained for six months to become a solar engineer, and she is bursting with energy. She can’t wait to start building solar lamps so that her community can have sustainable energy at last. One solar lamp could sell for up to 200 Quetzals, a lucrative business opportunity for a woman in a traditionally male-dominated field.
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Suhela Khan currently leads UN Women’s joint programme with UNEP, called "Women’s Entrepreneurship for Sustainable Energy Programme" in India. Launched at COP 21 in six countries, the Programme works on identifying and removing structural gender-specific barriers that female energy entrepreneurs face, enhancing women’s productive use of sustainable energy, and increasing women’s participation and leadership in developing gender-responsive energy policies. UN Women spoke to Ms. Khan about how women’s access to clean energy and entrepreneurship can be improved in India, which is in the midst of a profound transformation in the energy sector.
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UN Women will showcase its best solutions on women’s role to boost the world’s access to energy, while at the same time fighting climate change, at this year’s EXPO in Astana, Kazakhstan, from 10 June to 10 September 2017.
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There is a clear link between energy access and women’s economic empowerment and well-being
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A truly transformational agenda on climate action and sustainable development with a historic gender equality compact was achieved in 2015. Parties to the Paris Agreement committed to take decisive action to arrest global warming and reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to respect, promote and consider their obligations on gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls when addressing climate change. This could and must be a departure point for ensuring that the fight against climate change must not only be about saving the one planet we have for future generations but equally about making it a Planet 50/50 for women and girls here and now and into the future.