International Day of the Girl Child

Three girl participants in the ‘One Win Leads to Another’ in Brazil celebrate during a basketball game. Photo: UN Women/Gustavo Stephan
Photo: UN Women/Gustavo Stephan

Stories | Video | Quiz | Join the conversation

The Issue

There are 1.1 billion girls in the world, and every one of them deserves equal opportunities for a better future. They are a source of energy, power and creativity. They can drive change and help build a better future for all. Yet, most girls face disadvantage and discrimination on a daily basis, and those living through crises are suffering even more.

UN Women statement for International Day of the Girl Child

On the International Day of the Girl Child, let us commit to investing in skills training and education for girls and livelihood activities for young women around the world who are facing crises. Read more»

This year, International Day of the Girl (11 October) will focus on the theme, "EmPOWER girls: Before, during and after conflict".

Every 10 minutes, somewhere in the world, an adolescent girl dies as a result of violence. In humanitarian emergencies, gender-based violence often increases, subjecting girls to sexual and physical violence, child marriage, exploitation and trafficking. Adolescent girls in conflict zones are 90 per cent more likely to be out of school when compared to girls in conflict-free countries, compromising their future prospects for work and financial independence as adults.

Across the world, empowered girls are raising their voices to fight for their rights and protection in all contexts. They are working to end violence against women and girls, to recognize indigenous rights, and to build peaceful and cohesive communities.

Video: Empowering girls—before, during, and after crises

 

Quiz

Think you know your facts on today’s 1.1 billion girls? Take our quiz to find out.

 

Her story

Lamija Gutić sits at her computer . Photo: Imrana Kapetanovic

From where I stand: “Changing the present, we are also changing the future”
Lamija Gutić is only 16 years old, and on her way to building technology solutions for a better world. An inspiration for many girls and women across the region, on the occasion of the International Day of the Girl, she talks about what the Sustainable Development Goals mean for her. Read more»


Rayanne Cristine Maximo Franca. Photo: UN Women

“It is time that the world hears our voice” —Rayanne Cristine Maximo Franca
Read more»

Sophia Pierre-Antoine. Photo: UN Women

“A big part of being a feminist is to make sure that young women know that they have rights”—Sophia Pierre-Antoine
Read more»

Elizabeth Chatuwa. Photo: Malawi Girl Guides/Otchiwe Nkosi

“When you stop violence against girls, they can change this world for better.” —Elizabeth Chatuwa
An education programme by UN Women and the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts is teaching young girls and women stop child marriage in Malawi. Read more»

Malvika Iyer. Photo: MHPV

“I grew up surrounded by the idea that as girls, we must be perfectly beautiful and get married.”— Malvika Iyer
Iyer lost both her arms in an explosion at 13. Today she is a disability rights activist and motivational speaker. Read more»

 


Join the conversation

Join the conversation around International Day of the Girl Child using the hashtag #dayofthegirl. A social media package with images and messages in English, Spanish and French is available here.

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See what happened last year on the Day of the Girl Child