Research from China reveals women more vulnerable to the impacts of climate change

Date: Thursday, December 22, 2016

On 12 December 2016, the one-year anniversary of the adoption of the Paris Climate Agreement, UN Women launched the new research report, “Gender Dimensions of Vulnerability to Climate Change in China” in Beijing. The research fills a crucial literature gap in the country and supports evidence-based discussion on the future of climate change and disaster reduction in China.

Ma Leijun, China Gender Fund Programme Officer from the UN Women China office moderated the launch event. Photo: UN Women/Yan Haoran
Ma Leijun, China Gender Fund Programme Officer from the UN Women China office moderated the launch event. Photo: UN Women/Yan Haoran

The research reveals that women in China are more vulnerable to the adverse impacts of climate change than men. Women have more limited access than men to resources for building resilience, including income, land, loans and access to off-farm employment. Women also have less skills training than men: 72 per cent of women and 46 per cent of men had never attended relevant training.

A gender ratio imbalance in knowledge of disaster emergency plans is also identified: 25 per cent of male respondents have this knowledge, whereas only 20 per cent of female respondents do.

The report’s data was collected through a policy review, 84 interviews with government officials and NGOs, and a survey of over 3,400 people in eight counties of Jiangsu, Qinghai and Shaanxi Provinces.

Read the full story on UN Women's regional website for Asia and the Pacific